CogSci 2004

31 July - 2 August 2004

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26th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society [link to conf] [Link to contact] [Link to site map]

Tutorial Program at Cognitive Science 2004, 4 August 2004

Page Contents

Introduction

Topics

Conference home

Arrangements

Eye Tracking

Original call

Organizing online seminars

Inquiry: Teaching Cog Sci

Latent Semantic Analysis

Introduction: The Tutorials program at Cognitive Science 2004 provides participants to gain new insights, knowledge, and skills from a broad range of areas in the field of cognitive science. Tutorial topics will be presented in a taught format and range from practical guidelines to academic issues and theory. This is the fourth year that tutorials in this format will be offered.

Tutorials will present tutorial material, that is, provide results that are established and to do so in an interactive format. They tend to involve an introduction to technical skills or methods (i.e., eye-tracking, statistical modelling, methods of supporting online seminars, and tools for teaching cognitive science). They will include substantial review of material. The level of presentation assumes that the attendees have at least a first degree in a cognate area. Several of the tutorials are related to this year's theme, Higher-order Cognition.

There is a student rate, and such students should bring their ID to show at registration.

Attendance at the tutorials does not require conference registration, but does not provide conference entrance.

Arrangements: There are four tutorials this year on Wednesday 30 July (rooms to be announced on the day). They cost $60 (about 40 pounds or 55 Euros) for a half-day tutorial and $40 for students. Payment can be made using the registration site on the conference page, or can be paid for on the day (if space is available). The program includes handouts, and a tea and a coffee break (including biscuits). Lunch is available nearby in downtown Boston. There will be a meeting of the tutorial committee and tutors after the tutorials, location to be announced on the day.

Registration for tutorial attendees will be from 8.30 am on 30 July in the lobby of the Park Plaza hotel. It should take less than 5 minutes to get from the tutorial desk to the tutorial rooms, but please allow yourself time to get to the room.

9.15 - 12.30 is the morning session (including 15 min. coffee break), and 2-515 pm is the afternoon session (including 15 min. tea break).

 Topics (currently 2003 is shown)

Using Eye Movements to Study Cognitive Processes
Rayner, Half-day (1400-1715)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

How to Plan and Run Online Seminars
Neal and Anastas, Half-day (0915-1230)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

Inquiry, a Tool for Teaching Cognitive Science
Bechtel et al., Half-day (0915-1230)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

Latent Semantic Analysis: Theory, Use and Applications
Dennis et al., Half-day (1400-1715)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

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Using Eye Movements to Study Cognitive Processes

Half-day tutorial (1400-1715)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

Keith Rayner
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
rayner@psych.umass.edu

For the past twenty-five years, many researchers have been using eye movement data to investigate various issues related to cognitive processing. Recording

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How to Plan and Run Online Seminars

Half-day tutorial (0915-1230)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

Lisa Neal
EDS Learning Solutions
Editor-in-Chief, eLearn Magazine, www.eLearnMag.org
lisa.neal@eds.com

Donna Anastas
Aptima
anastasi@aptima.com

 

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Inquiry, a Tool for Teaching Cognitive Science

Half-day tutorial (0915-1230)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

William Bechtel
Department of Philosophy
University of California, San Diego
bill@mechanism.ucsd.edu

Adele Abrahamsen, Washington University and UCSD

Carl Craver, Washington University

Peter Bradley, Washington University

This tutorial will introduce a web-based project (inquiry.wustl.edu) that is developing a modular, interdisciplinary approach to teaching research methodologies in the cognitive sciences. A common challenge in preparing undergraduate majors and minors in cognitive science is to assure that students graduate with at least a beginning-level mastery of how discoveries get made and defended in the varied disciplines of cognitive science.

 

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Latent Semantic Analysis: Theory, Use and Applications

Half-day tutorial (1400-1715)
in the Park Plaza, room to be announced

Simon Dennis, Tom Landauer, Walter Kintsch, and Jose Quesada
Institute of Cognitive Science
University of Colorado
dennissj@psych.colorado.edu

Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) is a theory and method for extracting and representing the contextual-usage meaning of words by statistical computations applied to a large corpus of text (Landauer & Dumais, 1997). The underlying idea is that the aggregate of all the word contexts in which a given word does and does not appear provides a set of mutual constraints that largely determines the similarity of meaning of words and sets of words to each other. These constraints can be solved using linear algebra methods, in particular, the Singular Value Decomposition.

 

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Co-Chairs

Frank E. Ritter (Penn State)
Frank Keller (U. of Edinburgh)

Committee members

Adele Abrahamsen (UCSD)
Fernanda Ferreira (Michigan State)
Todd Johnson (UT/Houston)
Gary Jones (Derby)
Padraic Monaghan (Warwick)
Chris Kello (George Mason)
Ching-Fan Sheu (Depaul)
Robert St. Amant (North Carolina State University)
Yvette Tenney (BBN Labs)
Richard Young (Hertfordshire)

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